Lean Design Workshop

This three- to five-day workshop teaches how to develop a product design that maximizes the customers value proposition, thereby meeting customer needs with a minimum of waste. It begins with the principles of lean and how they apply to a product’s design. It covers understanding the voice of the customer to how to most cost effectively address the customer’s needs with the product’s design. The principles covered in this workshop are illustrated with numerous examples and reinforced through a series of exercises.

1. INTRODUCTION

  • The Five Lean Thinking Principles
    1. Define Value to the Customer
    2. Identify the Value Stream and Eliminate Waste
    3. Make the Value-Creating Steps Flow
    4. Empower the Team
    5. Learn and Improve
  • Lean Design – Maximize Customer Value with a Minimum of Resources
  • The 13 Practices of Lean Design

2. DETERMINE WHAT CUSTOMERS VALUE

  • Voice of the Customer
  • Developing Customer Focus as a Basis for Maximizing Customer Value
  • Starting Point: Understanding the Voice of the Customer
  • The Kano Model
  • Methods for Voice of the Customer Investigation
  • Digging Deeper than Stated Customer Needs with Observation
  • Determining the Value of Customer Needs with Conjoint Analysis
  • Organizing and Distilling Customer Needs with Affinity Diagramming and Customer FAST Diagrams

3. MAXIMIZING CUSTOMER VALUE IN PLANNING PRODUCT REQUIREMENTS

  • Requirements are the Ultimate Cost Driver
  • Start with the Customer Value Proposition
  • Conjoint Analysis – Determine What is of Value to the Customer
  • Planning Products with Quality Function Deployment (QFD) to Assure a Correct Focus on Customer Needs
  • Competitive Analysis: Developing the Product Strategy and the Customer Value Proposition
  • Translating Customer Needs into Technical Characteristics or Product Requirements
  • Maximize the Value Proposition – Avoid Unnecessary/Low Priority Functions, Features and Capabilities
  • Making Tradeoffs to Maximize Customer Value
  • Using Quality Function Deployment to Balance Requirements, Specification Values and Cost
  • Using Quality Function Deployment to Understand Cost Drivers
  • Customer Function Diagram to Abstract Requirements and Assess Completeness

4. ESTABLISHING A TARGET COST

  • Establishing a Market-Driven Target Price or Price-to-Win
  • Determining Supply Chain Margins, Distribution Costs, Warranty Costs, Corporate Allocations & Profit
  • Determining a Target Cost From the Target Price
  • Target Cost Worksheet & Example
  • Allocating & Tracking Target Costs
  • Using Product Cost Models and Cost Tables to Track Target Costs/Design to Cost Achievement
  • Basic Product Cost Models – BOM Cost Roll-ups and Spreadsheets
  • Creating and Refining a Predictive Cost Model
  • Commercial Cost Model Tools
  • Validating Cost Projections
  • Cost Tracking and Performance Monitoring
  • Life Cycle Cost Costs & Cost Models

5. EMPOWERED CROSS-FUNCTIONAL TEAMS: KEY FOR LEAN DESIGN

  • Why Cross Functional Teams?
  • Relationship to Functional Management vs. Program Management
  • Steps to Create Effective Cross-Functional Teams
  • Importance of Collocation or Virtual Collocation
  • Exercise: Cross-Functional Team
  • Empowering Teams for Lean Product Design
  • What Does Empowerment Mean?
  • Pushing Down Decision-Making to Lowest Effective Level
  • Going Beyond Assignment to Adequate Involvement
  • Impact of Experience and Skill Level on Team Effectiveness

6. LEAN DESIGN ACTIONS DURING CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

  • Use of Function Analysis to Explore Concept Requirements and Reduce Costs
  • Value Engineering & the Function Analysis/Value Analysis Methodology
    • Function Analysis Exercise I
    • Function Cost Matrix & Value Analysis Matrix
    • Function Analysis System Technique (FAST)
    • Function Analysis Exercise II
  • Importance of Exploring Concept Alternatives
  • Brainstorming and Other Creativity Techniques
  • TRIZ and Theory of Inventive Problem Solving
  • Concept Evaluation and Concept Selection Matrix
  • Architecture Rules to Maximize Customer Value and Minimize Cost
    • Selecting Parameter Values to Maximize System Performance and Minimize Cost
    • Simplification and the Impact of Architecture
    • Simulate and Optimize the Concept Design

7. LEAN DESIGN ACTIONS DURING ASSEMBLY DESIGN

  • The Power of Considering Assembly Design Alternatives
  • Design for Assembly (DFA)
    • DFA Principles & Guidelines
    • The Key DFA Principle – Simplification
    • DFA Exercise I
    • Avoiding Non-Recurring Costs with Standardization
    • Mistake-Proofing Assembly
    • Assembly Process and DFA Principles
      • Handling and Orientation
      • Location and Insertion
      • Joining and Fastening
      • Adjustment & Finishing
    • DFA Exercise II
    • Design for Assembly with Electronics
  • Design for Test – Developing an Economic Test Strategy

8. LEAN DESIGN ACTIONS DURING PART DESIGN/SELECTION

  • Evaluating Material and Process Alternatives
  • Trade-offs of Nonrecurring and Recurring Costs with Tooling and Near Net Shape Parts
  • Design for Manufacturability (DFM)
  • Defining and Applying DFM Principles & Guidelines
  • Reducing Costs with Early Supplier Involvement & Effective Supplier Partnership
  • Purchasing Actions to Reduce Cost
  • Minimizing Supply Chain and Logistics Costs
  • Designing in Quality and Robustness to Minimize Waste

9. LEAN DESIGN ACTIONS DURING PROCESS DESIGN

  • Principles of Process Design for Low Cost
  • Cost Reduction through Automation and Integration
  • Re-engineering the Development and Production Processes
  • Eliminating Non-Value-Added Activities
  • Minimizing Cost Through Maximizing Process Capability
  • Optimizing Tolerances for Low Cost

10. LEAN DESIGN PROCESS

  • Process Steps to Achieve Lean Design
  • Organizational Roles and Responsibilities for Lean Design
  • Capturing Input and Feedback to Optimize Design
  • Design Reviews and Other Verification Steps
  • Essential Metrics to Track Target Cost Achievement

11. ACHIEVING LEAN DESIGN

  • Challenging Your Assumptions
  • Achieving Lean Design – Summary by Development Phase
  • The 10 Steps to Lean Design
  • Developing an Action Plan to Close the Gap
  • Sources of Further Information
  • Questions and Answers

12. LEAN DESIGN EXERCISE (OPTIONAL)

  • Optional Exercises Analyzing Company Item(s) on Last Day