Featured Workshops

Voice of the Customer Workshop

This one- to three-day, hands-on workshop addresses the importance of capturing the voice of the customer (VOC) to drive product development, presents how to undertake various VOC methodologies, discusses when they should be used, and leads participants through the process of planning how to capture the VOC. The workshop includes exercises to develop practical experience with various VOC methods and results in the development of a VOC plan for an actual product opportunity. 1. INTRODUCTION

  • VOC Introduction
  • The Importance of Capturing the Voice of the Customer (VOC)
2. MARKET AND PRODUCT PLANNING
  • Market & Product Planning: A Starting Point for Voice of the Customer
  • The Product Planning Process
  • Define the Target Market
  • Market Definition Exercise
  • Position the Product
  • Identify Characteristics of the Customers in the Target Market Segment
3. VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER
  • Types of Customer Needs
  • Kano Model - A Useful Framework for Understanding Different Types of Customer Needs
  • Spoken and Unspoken Needs
  • Identify Opportunities for Excitement
  • Impact of the Customer Relationship on Capturing VOC
  • Internal vs. External Perspective of Needs
  • Determining the VOC
    • Participation in VOC Investigation
    • Guidelines for Determining the VOC
    • What Do We Want to Know
  • Evolutionary Product Development and Continuous Customer Need Definition
  • How Many Customers Do We Talk To?
  • Customer Types
  • Lead Users - Why They Are Important
  • Validity and Reliability in VOC Research
  • VOC Program Step-By-Step
4. VOC METHODS AND FRAMEWORK
  • VOC Method Framework
  • Starting Point: What Are the VOC Objectives
  • Methods for Capturing VOC
  • Sales Input - Common, But Limited
  • Market Research
    • Market Research Phases and Typical Areas of Investigation
    • Primary Research vs. Secondary Research
    • Sources for Secondary Research
    • Research Methods - Surveys vs. Testing
    • Survey Methods
    • Use of Web-Based Surveys - Advantages and Disadvantages
    • Market Research Case Study Video: New Coke
    • Market Research Exercise
  • Customer Interviews
    • The Three Types of Interviews - Which One is Best?
    • Setting Up Interviews
    • Preparing for Interviews
    • Conducting Interviews
    • Guidelines for Structuring Questions
    • Customer Interview Exercise
  • Focus Groups
    • Advantages and Disadvantages
    • The Two Types of Focus Groups
    • Preparation
    • Conducting the Focus Group
  • Why Observation is Important - Going Beyond What the Customer Says
  • Ethnography - What is It and Why is It Important
  • Three Variations of Ethnographic Study - Contextual Inquiry, Empathic Design & Cultural Ethnography
    • Contextual Inquiry (Ethnographic Interviews)
    • Ethnographic Study
    • Empathic Design - Making Effective Use of Observational Data
    • Common Elements
    • Steps in the Process
  • Video Observation - What To Know Before You Bring The Camera
  • Customer Observation Case Studies
  • Customer Observation Exercise
  • Participatory Design or Cooperative Design - Harnessing the VOC Directly
  • Address Both Internal and External Customer Needs
  • Other Sources of the VOC
    • Warranty Data
    • Customer Returns
    • Customer Service/Support Feedback
    • Direct Customer Feedback
  • VOC Case Study Video: Intuit
5. CAPTURING AND ORGANIZING THE VOC
  • Objective In Organizing VOC Data
  • Analyzing, Organizing and Distilling Customer Needs
  • Affinity Diagramming - A Method for Organizing VOC Data
  • Creating Statements of Customer Needs
    • Guidelines for Creating Good Statements of Needs
    • Customer Needs Statement Exercise
  • Developing a Customer Needs Dictionary
  • Determining Importance by Prioritizing or Ranking Customer Needs
  • Maximizing Value with Conjoint Analysis
  • Conjoint Analysis Example
  • Conjoint Analysis Exercise
  • Documenting and Presenting the VOC
6. USING THE VOC TO DRIVE PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
  • Reporting and Using Results: From Ideation to Product Specifications
  • Problems with the Idea of "Features" Without a VOC
  • Drawing on VOC to Develop Marketing Platforms and Product Extensions
  • Prioritizing Customer Needs
  • Customer Needs - Refrigerator Example
  • Introduction to Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
    • The QFD Process
    • QFD Product Planning Matrix (PPM)
    • QFD Product Planning Matrix - Refrigerator Example
    • Benefits of QFD
  • Documenting Product Requirements / Specifications
  • Function Tree - Fill-In Expected Customer Needs
  • VOC and QFD as a Basis for Concept Development
  • Concept Testing and Market Testing
  • VOC and Concept Development Case Study Video: IDEO Shopping Cart
7. VOC PLANNING
  • VOC Planning for Your Company and Project
  • Exercise - Developing a Plan for Voice of the Customer Research

Target Costing Workshop

This is a three-day workshop for management and development personnel responsible for establishing and using a target costing process and managing the achievement of a target cost. 1. INTRODUCTION

  • Target Costing Introduction and Definition
  • Comparison with Traditional Product Cost Management
  • Target Costing & Design to Cost
2. PRODUCT ECONOMICS
  • Economics of Product Development
  • Relationship of Price, Product Costs, Development Costs & Volume
  • Elements of Costs and Life Cycle Costs (LCC)
  • Nonrecurring Development Costs and Recurring Production Costs
  • Tradeoff's Between Recurring & Nonrecurring Costs
  • Obtaining & Using Manufacturing and Supplier Cost Data
3. STRATEGY AND PRICING
  • Product Strategy as a Basis for a Pricing Strategy
  • Assessing Customer Affordability & Competitive Implications
  • Obtaining Customer Feedback on Affordability & Value
  • Establishing Market-Driven Prices or Price-to-Win
  • Pricing Strategies: Cost-Based Pricing, Competitive Pricing, Value-Based Pricing, and Experience Curve-Based Pricing
  • Offensive and Defensive Pricing Strategies
  • Demand Elasticity and Considerations in Pricing
  • Pricing Exercise
  • Maximizing Value
    • Value Innovation Concept
    • Value Innovation Case Study
  • Determining Which Features Customers Value
    • Voice of the Customer Investigation
    • Conjoint Analysis
    • Conjoint Analysis Example
    • Conjoint Analysis Exercise
  • Maximize the Customer Value Proposition with Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
  • Consider Customer Needs vs. a Target Price
  • Setting the Target Price
4. ESTABLISHING A TARGET COST
  • Determining a Target Cost From the Target Price
    • Determining Supply Chain Margins, Distribution Costs, Warranty Costs, Corporate Allocations & Profit
    • Target Cost Worksheet & Example
  • Using Quality Function Deployment (QFD) to Balance Requirements and Cost
    • Identify Cost Drivers with QFD
    • Using QFD to Balance Specification Values and Cost
  • Customer Function Diagram to Abstract Requirements and Assess Completeness
  • Using Quality Function Deployment to Balance Requirements and Target Cost
  • Allocating & Tracking Target Costs
  • Developing the Overall Business Case for a New Product
  • Exercise - New Product Business Case
5. ESTIMATING & TRACKING COSTS
  • Using Product Cost Models and Cost Tables to Achieve Target Costs
  • Basic Product Cost Models - BOM Cost Roll-ups and Spreadsheets
  • Creating and Refining a Predictive Cost Model
  • Commercial Cost Model Tools
  • Validating Cost Projections
  • Cost Tracking and Performance Monitoring
  • Target Cost Tracking Worksheet
6. TARGET COSTING DURING CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
  • Use of Function Analysis to Explore Concept Requirements and Reduce Costs
  • Value Engineering & the Function Analysis/Value Analysis Methodology
    • Function Analysis Exercise
    • Function Cost Matrix & Value Analysis Matrix
    • Function Analysis System Technique (FAST)
    • Function Analysis Exercise II
  • Importance of Exploring Concept Alternatives - The Seven Alternatives Approach
  • Brainstorming and Other Creativity Techniques
  • TRIZ and Theory of Inventive Problem Solving
  • Trimming and Simplification
  • Optimizing Concept Design
  • Concept Evaluation and Concept Selection Matrix
  • Simplification and the Impact of Architecture on DTC
7. TARGET COSTING DURING ASSEMBLY DESIGN
  • Function Analysis with Assembly Design
  • The Power of Considering Assembly Design Alternatives
  • Design for Assembly (DFA)
    • DFA Principles & Guidelines
    • The Key DFA Principle - Simplification
    • DFA Exercise
    • Avoiding Non-Recurring Costs with Standardization
    • Mistake-Proofing Assembly
    • Assembly Process and DFA Principles
      • Handling and Orientation
      • Location a ndInsertion
      • Joining and Fastening
      • Adjustment & Finishing
  • Design for Test - Developing an Economic Test Strategy
8. TARGET COSTING DURING PART DESIGN/SELECTION
  • Function Analysis with Part Design
  • Evaluating Material and Process Alternatives
  • Trade-offs of Nonrecurring and Recurring Costs with Tooling Near Net Shape Parts
  • Standardization and Simplification
  • Design for Manufacturability (DFM)
    • Evaluating Material and Process Alternatives
    • Production Rate & Cost Trade-off's: Materials, Manufacturing & Tooling
    • DFM Principles & Guidelines - Machining, Sheetmetal, Injection Molding & PWB's
    • DFM Exercise
  • Reducing Costs with Early Supplier Involvement & Effective Supplier Partnership
  • Purchasing Actions to Reduce Cost
  • Minimizing Supply Chain and Logistics Costs
9. TARGET COSTING DURING PROCESS DESIGN
  • Principles of Process Design for Low Cost
  • The Role of Value Engineering in Process Design & Improvement
  • Cost Reduction through Automation and Integration
  • Re-engineering the Development and Production Processes
  • The Production Preparation Process (3P)
  • Considering Process Design Alternatives - The Seven Ways Approach
  • Eliminating Non-Value-Added Activities
  • Minimizing Cost Through Maximizing Process Capability
  • Centering the Mean and Establishing Realistic Tolerances
  • Optimizing Tolerances for Low Cost
10. ACHIEVING TARGET COSTS
  • Challenging Your Assumptions
  • Target Cost Exercise
  • Achieving Target Cost - Summary by Development Phase
11. PROCESS, MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATION
  • Establishing a Target Costing Program
  • The Target Costing and Design-to-Cost Process
  • Avoiding Local Optimization and Global Suboptimization - Organizational Issues
  • Use of Product Development Teams to Achieve Cost Targets
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Establishing a Target Costing Program
  • Essential Metrics to Track Target Cost Achievement
12. IMPLEMENTATION & SUMMARY
  • Questions to Consider During the Five Stages of Development
  • The 10 Steps to Target Costing/Design-to-Cost
  • Deploying a Target Cost Program to Your Business/Project
  • Overcoming Impediments and Applying Lessons Learned
  • Developing an Action Plan to Close the Gap
  • Sources of Further Information
  • Questions and Answers

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) Workshop

This three-day, hands-on workshop presents the QFD methodology, provides practical tips on how to effectively conduct QFD product planning, and uses a series of exercises involving actual product hardware to develop a practical understanding of how to use QFD to capture the voice of the customer (VOC), perform competitive analysis, develop a product strategy, and derive product requirements. 1. INTRODUCTION

  • Product Planning and Voice of the Customer
  • QFD Introduction
  • Basic QFD - The Four Phases
2. VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER - INPUT TO QFD PLANNING
  • First Step: Define the Target Market and Your Customers
  • Exercises: Market Definition and Product Positioning for a New Pocket Calculator
  • Kano Model and Types of Customer Requirements (Spoken and Unspoken)
  • The Importance of Capturing the Voice of the Customer (VOC)
  • Methods for Capturing VOC
    • Market Research - Primary and Secondary Research
    • Surveys and Effective Ways to Ask Questions
    • Exercise - Developing a Survey to Gather Customer Needs for a Pocket Calculator
    • Customer Interviews - Methods to Plan and Conduct Effective Interviews
    • Exercise - Developing an Interview Guide and conducting Interviews to Gather Customer Needs for a Pocket Calculator
    • Focus Groups - Advantages, Disadvantages, and Guidelines to Conduct a Focus Group
    • Observation - Ethnography, Contectual Inquiry, Empathic Design
    • Exercise - Observing the Use of a Pocket Calculator to Identify Unstated Needs
  • Creating Effective Statements of Customer Needs
  • Organizing Customer Needs with Affinity Diagramming
  • Creating a Customer Needs Data Dictionary to Fully Define the Need
3. PRODUCT PLANNING (HOUSE OF QUALITY)
  • Development of the Product Planning Matrix Based on Voice of the Customer
  • Customer Needs and Priorities
  • Competitive Assessment & Product Strategy
  • QFD Exercise 1: Organizing Customer Needs, Evaluating the Competition and Developing a Product Strategy (Team Development of a New Pocket Calculator Product )
  • Guidelines for Developing Technical Characteristics or Product Requirements
  • QFD Exercise 2: Developing Technical Characteristics for the New Product & Establishing Relationships with Customer Needs
  • Performing the Technical Evaluation and Setting Preliminary Target Values
  • QFD Exercise 3: Performing a Technical Evaluation (Product Benchmarking with Competitive Calculators)
  • Identifying and Addressing Interactions
  • Technical Difficulty and Program Risks
  • Exercise 4: Considering Interactions, Risks, Importance Ratings, & Other Factors for Development
  • Steps to Finalize Product Planning
  • Exercise 5: Analyzing the Product Planning Matrix and Establishing Target Values
  • Creating and Overall Requirements of Specifications Document from the Product Planning Matrix
  • Identify Other Basic Functions - Function Analysis
4. CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
  • Concept Development
  • Concept Evaluation and Selection - Concept Selection Matrix
  • Concept Synthesis
  • Case Study - Concept Development and Selection
  • Exercise 6: Develop & Select Product Concept
4. SUBSYSTEM/PART DEPLOYMENT
  • The Flow of Product Development Activities and Preparation of the Deployment Matrix
  • Exercise 7: Deploy Design Requirements (Time Permitting)
  • Determining Critical Assembly/Part Characteristics
  • Exercise 8: Determine Critical Part Characteristics, Relationships, Importance Ratings & Target Values Time Permitting
5. PROCESS & PRODUCTION PLANNING
  • Deploy Selected Part Characteristics
  • Evaluate & Select Process Approach
  • Determine Process Relationships & Critical Process Parameters
  • Establish Quality Control and Process Control Parameters
6. QFD FRAMEWORK AND PROCESS
  • QFD and the Product Development Process
  • Planning a QFD Project
  • Avoiding Pitfalls with QFD
  • Summary and Questions and Answers

Mistake-Proofing by Design Workshop

This two-day workshop describes the principles of mistake-proofing or poka-yoke and the proactive approach of addressing mistake-proofing during development versus installing mistake-proofing devices and approaches on the factory floor after the product has been put into production. 1. INTRODUCTION

  • Why Mistake-Proofing - Defects Happen
  • Quality Framework and Evolution
    • Inspection to Detect Defects
    • Inspection to Provide Information to Improve the Process
    • Mistake-Proofing and Source Inspection to Eliminate Defects
  • Shiego Shingo: Source Inspection, Zero Quality Control, and the Poka-Yoke System
  • A Further Evolutionary Step - Mistake-Proofing By Design
  • The Six Principles of Mistake Proofing - an Introduction
2. POKA YOKE
  • The Three Primary Poka Yoke Methods
    • Contact
    • Counting
    • Motion-Sequence
  • Types of Sensing Devices
  • Poka Yoke Applications and Examples
  • Poka Yoke in Automated vs. Manual Processes
3. MISTAKE-PROOFING PRINCIPLES
  • Hierarchy of Principles and Moving Upstream to Product & Process Design
  • Principle of Elimination
    • Role of Product Design - Design out Potential Defects
    • Examples
  • Principle of Replacement
    • Replace Error-Prone Product Features/Items
    • Replace Error-Prone Process Steps
    • Examples
  • Principle of Prevention
    • Prevent Errors with Product Design - Guidelines & Techniques
    • Prevent Errors with Process Design - Guidelines & Techniques
    • Poke-Yoke Devices - Sensors, Counters & Other
    • Examples
  • Principle of Facilitation
    • Product Design Techniques to Facilitate Error Avoidance
    • Process Design Techniques to Facilitate Error Avoidance
    • Visual Controls
    • Examples
  • Principle of Detection
    • Defect Detection - Poke Yoke Devices & Self-Checking
    • Examples
  • Principle of Mitigation
    • Examples
4. MISTAKE-PROOFING AND DFM/A
  • Principles of Design for Manufacturability/Assembly (DFM/A)
    • Avoiding Complexity - Simplicity and Standardization
    • Part Orientation and Handling to Facilitate Mistake-Proofing
    • Insertion and Assembly
    • Fastening
  • Tolerances and Process Capability
  • Impact of DFM/A on Quality and Defects
  • DFM/A Examples
  • Relationship of DFM/A Principles to Mistake-Proofing
  • DFM/A and Mistake-Proofing Exercises
5. MISTAKE-PROOFING USE AND SERVICE
  • Mistake-Proofing Customer Use
  • Mistake-Proofing Customer Use Examples
  • Mistake-Proofing Product Service
  • Mistake-Proofing Service Examples
6. PROCESS FOR MISTAKE-PROOFING BY DESIGN
  • Three Approaches to Mistake-Proofing
    • Defect Analysis (Existing Products)
    • Prioritizing Opportunities with Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis
    • Comprehensive Process Step Design
  • Mistake-Proofing Taxonomy
  • Understanding and Applying the Economics of Mistake-Proofing
  • Examples of Mistake-Proofing with Your Products
  • Discussion of Potential Opportunities with Your Products
7. SUMMARY
  • Steps to Take to Implement a Mistake-Proofing Program
  • Discussion and Questions
8. PRODUCT ANALYSIS OR FACTORY WALK-THROUGH
  • Workshop Exercise to Apply Principles and Analysis to a Current Product and Production Process
  • Factory Walk-Through to Identify Mistake-Proofing Opportunities and Techniques

Lean Product Development Workshop

This two- to three-day workshop addresses the principles and practices of lean product development which is focused on reducing waste, work-in-process, and cycle time for product development. It also addresses lean design which focuses on reducing waste in the form of higher cost and poor quality in the design of the product itself. 1. LEAN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

  • Lean Product Development Objectives: Less Resources, Time, Cost & Waste
  • The Five Lean Product Development Principles
    1. Define Value to the Customer
    2. Identify the Value Stream and Eliminate Waste
    3. Make the Value-Creating Steps Flow
    4. Empower the Team
    5. Learn and Improve
  • Seventeen Practices and Tools of Lean Product Development
2. FIRST PRINCIPLE: DEFINE VALUE TO THE CUSTOMER
  • Practice 1: Voice of the Customer
    • Developing Customer Focus as a Basis for Maximizing Customer Value
    • Starting Point: Understanding the Voice of the Customer
    • The Kano Model
    • Methods for Voice of the Customer Investigation
    • Digging Deeper than Stated Customer Needs with Observation
    • Determining the Value of Customer Needs with Conjoint Analysis
    • Organizing and Distilling Customer Needs with Affinity Diagramming and Customer FAST Diagrams
  • Practice 2: Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
    • Planning Products with Quality Function Deployment (QFD) to Assure a Correct Focus on Customer Needs
    • Competitive Analysis: Developing the Product Strategy and the Customer Value Proposition
    • Maximize the Value Proposition - Avoid Unnecessary/Low Priority Functions, Features and Capabilities
    • Making Tradeoffs to Maximize Customer Value
  • Practice 3: Lean Design
    • Target Costing - A Basis for Customer Value
    • Applying Design to Cost (DTC) to Achieve a Target Cost
    • Exercise: Deriving a Target Cost
    • A Comprehensive Approach to DTC Achievement During the Four Development Phases
      • Concept Development
      • Assembly Design
      • Part Design/Selection
      • Process Design
    • Value Engineering & Function Analysis
    • Exercise: Function Analysis
    • Brainstorming and Other Creativity Techniques
    • Design for Manufacturability/Assembly (DFM/A)
    • Exercise: Design for Manufacturability/Assembly
    • Early Supplier Involvement and Supplier Cost Reduction
  • Practice 4: Platforms and Product Re-Use
    • The Benefits of Product/Technology Platforms
    • Planning and Managing Platform Development
    • Design Re-Use and Standardization
  • Practice 5: Rapidly Explore Alternatives
    • Impediments to Exploring Alternatives
    • Point-Based Design vs. Set-Based Design
    • Concept Selection Method and Case Study
3. SECOND PRINCIPLE: IDENTIFY THE VALUE STREAM AND REMOVE WASTE
  • Practice 6: Streamline the Development Process
    • Lean Gate Review Process to Streamline the Development Process
    • Creating a Flexible, Adaptable Development Process
    • Removing Waste from the Product Development Process
    • The Seven Wastes in Product Development
    • Value Stream Mapping and Process Mapping to Identify and Remove Waste
  • Practice 7: 5S Workplace
    • Applying the 5S Concepts to Product Development
    • Sort, Straighten and Sweep Project Data
    • Use PLM to Systemitize Product Data
  • Practice 8: Standardize Work
    • Standardize the Development Process to Simplify Planning and Avoid Relearning
    • Develop and Apply Architecture and Design Standards to Avoid Reinvention
  • Practice 9: Integrate Design Tools
    • Integrated vs. a Non-Integrated Process
    • Common Issues with Design Tools
4. THIRD PRINCIPLE: MAKE THE VALUE CREATING STEPS FLOW
  • Practice 10: Pipeline Management
    • Use of Portfolio Management to Prioritize Projects
    • Build a Business Case and Use a Phase-Gate Process to Minimize Waste with Less Opportune Projects
    • Control the Product Pipeline to Avoid Overload and Reduce Cycle Time
    • Queuing Theory and the Impact of Pipeline Overload
    • Defining Capacity and Determining Project Resource Requirements
    • Planning Overall Resource Requirements
    • Actions to Address Resource Overload and Manage the Pipeline
  • Practice 11: Flow Process and Pull Scheduling
    • Impact of Utilization of Queue Time and Leadtime
    • Project Staffing and Implications on Project Performance
    • Use Project Milestones to Pull Scheduling of Activities
    • Critical Chain Project Management - a Method for Lean Project Management
    • Creating a Cadence with Product Development to Maintain a Smooth Flow Through the Product Pipeline
    • Bead Exercise
  • Practice 12: Reduced Batch Sizes
    • Effect of Cycle Time, Resource Utilization and Batch Size
    • Architecture Principles for Reduced Batch Sizes
    • Move Platform Development Offline
    • How to Reduce Batch Sizes with Hardware Development
    • How to Reduce Batch Sizes with Software Development
  • Practice 13: Synchronize Activities
    • Focus on Interfaces and Handoffs
    • Colloction Improves Coordination and Communication
    • Applying Visual Management Techniques, a Standard Lean Practice, to Product Development
  • Practice 14: Defer Commitment
    • Avoid Changes by Deferring Commitment
    • Steps to Defer Commitment
    • Enabling Architecture
5. FOURTH PRINCIPLE: EMPOWER THE TEAM
  • Practice 15: Cross-Functional Team
    • Cross Functional Teams Create a Product Development Workcell
    • Relationship to Functional Management vs. Program Management
    • Steps to Create Effective Cross-Functional Teams
    • Importance of Collocation or Virtual Collocation
    • Exercise: Cross-Functional Team
  • Practice 16: Workforce Empowerment
    • Empowerment as a Basis for Lean Product Development
    • What Does Empowerment Mean?
    • Pushing Down Decision-Making to Lowest Effective Level
  • Practice 17: Right Resources
    • Going Beyond Assignment to Adequate Involvement
    • Impact of Experience and Skill Level on Team Effectiveness
6. FIFTH PRINCIPLE: LEARN AND IMPROVE
  • Practice 18: Amplify Learning
    • The Learning Enterprise: "Do it right the first time" or "Fail often and fail early"
    • Prototyping, Learning and Feedback
    • Advance Quality Planning or Like Product and Process Review
    • Project Reviews as a Learning Mechanism
    • Closed-Loop Improvement Approach
7. LEAN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT SUMMARY
  • Summary - The Product Development Factory
  • Transition to a Lean Product Development Environment
  • Structuring an Action Plan for Improvement
  • Workshop Wrap-Up and Final Questions

Design to Cost Workshop

This three- to four-day workshop addresses how to establish a target price and cost and then achieve the cost target during requirements definition, concept development, assembly & part design, and process design. 1. INTRODUCTION

  • Effect of Product Development on Cost
  • Traditional Approach to Product Cost Management
  • Target Cost Approach & Comparison
  • Design to Cost (DTC) as a Basis to Achieve a Target Cost
  • A Comprehensive Approach to DTC Achievement During the Five Development Phases:
    • Requirements Definition
    • Concept Development
    • Assembly Design
    • Part Design/Selection
    • Process Design
2. PRODUCT ECONOMICS
  • Economics of Product Development
  • Relationship of Product Costs, Development Costs & Volume
  • Elements of Costs and Life Cycle Costs (LCC)
  • Nonrecurring Development Costs and Recurring Production Costs
  • Tradeoff's Between Recurring & Nonrecurring Costs
  • Obtaining & Using Manufacturing and Supplier Cost Data
  • Experience Curves
  • Exercise - New Product Business Case
3. DEVELOPING A DESIGN TO COST OBJECTIVE & TRACKING COSTS
  • Determining a Target Cost/Design to Cost Objective From the Target Price
    • Determining Supply Chain Margins, Distribution Costs, Warranty Costs, Corporate Allocations & Profit
    • Target Cost Worksheet & Example
  • Allocating & Tracking Target Costs/Design to Cost Objectives
  • Using Product Cost Models and Cost Tables to Track Target Costs/Design to Cost Achievement
  • Basic Product Cost Models - BOM Cost Roll-ups and Spreadsheets
  • Creating and Refining a Predictive Cost Model
  • Commercial Cost Model Tools
  • Validating Cost Projections
  • Cost Tracking and Performance Monitoring
  • Target Cost Tracking Worksheet
  • Life Cycle Cost Costs & Cost Models
4. DTC DURING REQUIREMENTS DEFINITION
  • Requirements are the Ultimate Cost Driver
  • Start with the Customer Value Proposition
  • Conjoint Analysis - Determine What is of Value to the Customer
  • Focus on Customer Needs - Functionality vs. Affordability
    • Using Quality Function Deployment to Balance Requirements and Cost
    • Using Quality Function Deployment to Understand Cost Drivers
    • Using Quality Function Deployment to Balance Specification Values and Cost
  • Customer Function Diagram to Abstract Requirements and Assess Completeness
  • Evaluating Requirements Based on High Cost to Function Ratio
5. DTC DURING CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
  • Use of Function Analysis to Explore Concept Requirements and Reduce Costs
  • Value Engineering & the Function Analysis/Value Analysis Methodology
    • Function Analysis Exercise I
    • Function Cost Matrix & Value Analysis Matrix
    • Function Analysis System Technique (FAST)
    • Function Analysis Exercise II
  • Importance of Exploring Concept Alternatives - The Seven Alternatives Method
  • Brainstorming and Other Creativity Techniques
  • TRIZ and Theory of Inventive Problem Solving
  • Trimming and Simplification
  • Optimizing the Concept Design
  • Concept Evaluation and Concept Selection Matrix
  • Simplification and the Impact of Architecture on DTC
6. DTC DURING ASSEMBLY DESIGN
  • Function Analysis with Assembly Design
  • The Power of Considering Assembly Design Alternatives
  • Design for Assembly (DFA)
    • DFA Principles & Guidelines
    • The Key DFA Principle - Simplification
    • DFA Exercise I
    • Avoiding Non-Recurring Costs with Standardization
    • Mistake-Proofing Assembly
    • Mistake-Proofing Exercise
    • Assembly Process and DFA Principles
      • Handling and Orientation
      • Location and Insertion
      • Joining and Fastening
      • Adjustment & Finishing
    • DFA Exercise II
  • Design for Test - Developing an Economic Test Strategy
7. DTC DURING PART DESIGN/SELECTION
  • Function Analysis with Part Design
  • Evaluating Material and Process Alternatives
  • Trade-offs of Nonrecurring and Recurring Costs with Tooling Near Net Shape Parts
  • Standardization and Simplification
  • Design for Manufacturability (DFM)
    • Evaluating Material and Process Alternatives
    • Production Rate & Cost Trade-off's: Materials, Manufacturing & Tooling
    • DFM Principles & Guidelines - Machining, Sheetmetal, Injection Molding & PWB's
    • DFM Exercise
  • Reducing Costs with Early Supplier Involvement & Effective Supplier Partnership
  • Purchasing Actions to Reduce Cost
  • Minimizing Supply Chain and Logistics Costs
8. DTC DURING PROCESS DESIGN
  • Principles of Process Design for Low Cost
  • The Role of Value Engineering in Process Design & Improvement
  • Cost Reduction through Automation and Integration
  • Re-engineering the Development and Production Processes
  • The Production Preparation Process (3P)
  • Considering the Most Economic Process with Seven Ways
  • Eliminating Non-Value-Added Activities
  • Minimizing Cost Through Maximizing Process Capability
  • Centering the Mean and Establishing Realistic Tolerances
  • Optimizing Tolerances for Low Cost
9. ACHIEVING DESIGN TO COST
  • Challenging Your Assumptions
  • DTC Exercise
  • Achieving DTC - Summary by Development Phase
10. DTC PROCESS AND ORGANIZATION
  • Establishing a Design to Cost Program
  • The Design-to-Cost and DFM/A Process
  • Design Reviews
  • Avoiding Local Optimization and Global Suboptimization - Organizational Issues
  • Use of Product Development Teams to Achieve Cost Targets
  • Roles and Responsibilities
  • Supplier Roles in Design to Cost
  • Essential Metrics to Track Target Cost Achievement
11. IMPLEMENTATION & SUMMARY
  • The 10 Steps to Design-to-Cost
  • Deploying a Design to Cost Program to Your Business/Project
  • Overcoming Impediments and Applying Lessons Learned
  • Developing an Action Plan to Close the Gap
  • Sources of Further Information
  • Questions and Answers
12. DTC EXERCISE
  • Exercise Analyzing Company Item(s)

Design for Serviceability/Maintainability Workshop

This three-day, practical, hands-on workshop covers the principles of design for serviceability and maintainability illustrating these principles with numerous examples of good and bad application. The workshop includes exercises to reinforce understanding of principles. The final exercise uses one or more of your company's products and service procedures to analyze serviceability and identify changes to improve the serviceability of the design. The workshop is intended for design and service personnel who need to colloborate during development to develop a serviceable or maintainable design along with technical and program management. 1. INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN FOR SERVICEABILITY/MAINTAINABILITY

  • Introductions, Agenda, and Capturing Issues for Discussion
  • Design for Serviceability (DFS)/Design for Maintainability Overview
  • The Five Service Process Drivers as a Framework for Analysis
  • Cost Relationships – Reliability/Durability, Diagnosibility and Service Cost
  • Address DFS Fallacies
  • Design for Serviceability/Maintainability Objectives
    • Reduce Service Requirements and Frequency
    • Facilitate Diagnosis
    • Minimize the Time and Effort to Disassemble, Repair/ Replace, and Reassemble the Product as Part of the Service Process
    • Reduce Costs of Service Parts
2. DESIGN FOR SERVICEABILITY/MAINTAINABILITY PLANNING
  • Customer Needs Related to Reliability, Availability and Serviceability/Maintainability - A Basis for Planning
  • Develop a Service Strategy
  • Consider Levels of Repair Strategies
  • Consider Spare Parts Strategies
  • Service Strategy Paradigm Shifts
  • Derive Product Requirements Related to Serviceability/Maintainability
3. DESIGN FOR RELIABILITY AND DURABILITY TO MINIMIZE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS
  • Design for Reliability
  • Use Voice of the Customer to Understand the Range of Operating Environments
  • Tools to Analyze and Improve Reliability During Development and Operation
    • Reliability Prediction
    • Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)
    • Failure Reporting and Corrective Action System (FRACAS)
  • Design Strategies and Techniques to Improve Reliability
  • Design for Durability
  • Design Strategies and Techniques to Improve Durability
4. DESIGN FOR DIAGNOSIBILITY
  • Testing and Diagnosis
  • Types of Faults
  • Visisbility to Isolate Failures and Faults
  • Guidelines for External Test
  • Guidelines for Internal Test and Monitoring
  • Built-In Self-Test
    • Capture Operating Parameters with Sensors
    • Establishing and Monitoring Set-Points for Alarms
    • Capture Equipment History and Trends to Provide Context for Diagnosis
    • Local vs. Remote Monitoring
  • Fault Tree Analysis to Develop Trouble-Shooting Guides
  • Using Diagnostic Data to Troubleshoot and Determine the Problem
  • Presenting Diagnostic Information – Human Factors with Indicators, Displays and Messages
5. DESIGN FOR SERVICEABILITY/MAINTAINABILITY OVER-ARCHING PRINCIPLES
  • Three Over-Arching Principles - Simplification, Standardization and Mistake-Proofing
  • Simplify Product Architecture
    • Modular vs. Integrative Architecture Trade-offs
    • Use Multi-Function Modules and Take Advantage of Module Structure
    • Simplify Interconnections
  • Simplify Assembly Design; Minimize Parts to Reduce Service Procedure Steps
  • Criteria for Minimum Parts
  • Minimize Parts Exercise
  • Standardization - Minimize Part Variety
  • Standardization Approach and Method
  • Mistake-Proof Assembly (Poke Yoke)
  • The Six Mistake-Proofing Principles
    • Elimination
    • Replacement
    • Prevention
    • Facilitation
    • Detection
    • Mitigation
    • Examples of the Six Mistake-Proofing Principles
  • Mistake-Proofing Process
  • Mistake-Proofing Exercise - Identify Mistake-Proofing Opportunities
6. DESIGN FOR SERVICEABILITY/MAINTAINABILITY PROCESS AND PRINCIPLES
  • Starting Point: What are the Serviceable Items and Required Procedures
  • Design for ServiceabilityMaintainability Process
  • Principles Organized by the Service Process Step
  • Diagnosibility - Principles, Approaches and Human Factors Considerations
  • Consideration of Service Preparation Steps - Instructions, Marking and Labeling, Hand Tools, & Other Factors
  • Factors to Consider in Designing for Safe Service and Maintenance
  • Accessibility and Ergonomics
  • Minimize Disassembly Steps to Access Replaceable/Repairable Items
  • Disassembly Considerations
    • Unfastening: Fastening and Attachment Methods and Considerations
    • Threaded Fastener Considerations & Guidelines
    • Integral Attachment Guidelines and Examples
    • Interconnections: Disconnection and Removal
    • Minimize Weight and Handling
    • Minimize Disassembly and Assembly Motions
    • Design for Minimum and Common Service Tools
    • Part Robustness and Handling
    • Design for Ease of Disassembly and Removal
  • Repair and Replacement Considerations
    • Replacement Standards
    • Service Parts Considerations
    • Cleaning and Refurbishment
  • Reassembly Considerations
    • Design for Ease of Reassembly
    • Part or Module Handling and Orientation
    • Part or Module Insertion and Location
    • Self-Locating and Self-Fastening Features
    • Reconnection Considerations
    • Avoid Calibration and Adjustments
  • Case Studies and Benefits
  • Design for Service/Maintenance Exercise
7. DFS AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
  • Recommended DFS Process Steps by Development Phase
  • Early Service Involvement
  • Like Product and Process Review
  • Developing and Using Serviceability/Maintainability Design Guidelines and Checklists
  • Structured DFS Evaluation - Conducting Virtual Service Procedures with CAD Assembly Models and Prototype Products
  • Structured DFS Evaluation - Conducting Virtual Service Procedures with Prototype Products
  • Address DFS in Design Reviews
  • Track and Address Failures
  • Collect Data and Enhance Diagnosibility and Serviceability
  • Develop a Business Case to Justify DFS Features and Capabilities
  • DFS Performance Measurement & Metrics
8. SUMMARY
  • 10 Steps to Improve DFS
  • Key Success Factors
  • Questions and Discussion
9. DFS ANALYSIS OF COMPANY ITEM(S)
  • Exercise Objectives
  • Analysis Methodology
  • DFS Team Analysis Exercise
  • Review of Team Findings
  • Final Questions and Discussion

Design for Manufacturability/Assembly Workshop

This practical, hands-on workshop is three days in length. It includes over 240 examples of good and bad design for manufacturability and assembly practices. Exercises are used throughout to reinforce understanding of DFM/A principles. The workshop concludes with an exercise to analyze your company's assemblies to introduce a practical DFM/A analysis methodology. The workshop includes one day on-site prior to the workshop to customize it to your products and processes. 1. DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURABILITY/ ASSEMBLY (DFM/A)

  • DFM/A Introduction
  • Design Impact on Cost
  • DFM/A Fallacies vs. Reality
2. DESIGN FOR ASSEMBLY
  • Principles of Design for Assembly
  • Simplify Product Architecture
    • Modularity and Structure with Architecture
    • Partitioning, Collocation, and Orientation Effect on Interconnections
    • Modular Design vs. Integral Design
  • Simplicity - Minimize Part Count
  • Minimize Parts Exercise
  • Standardization - Minimize Part Variety
  • Standardization Approach and Method
  • Mistake-Proof Assembly - The Six Mistake-Proofing Principles and the Relative Benefit
    • Elimination Principle and Examples
    • Replacement Principle and Examples
    • Prevention Principle and Examples
    • Facilitation Principle and Examples
    • Detection Principle and Examples
    • Mitigation Principle and Examples
  • Mistake-Proofing Approach and Methodology
  • Mistake-Proofing Exercise - Identify Mistake-Proofing Opportunities
  • Assembly Process Framework
  • Design for Parts Feeding & Handling
  • Design for Part Orientation
    • Considering and Applying Symmetry vs. Asymmetry
    • Measuring Symmetry - Alpha, Beta and Combined Symmetry
  • Design for Location and Insertion
  • Minimize Flexible Parts
  • DFA Considerations with Gaskets, Interconnections, & Connectors
  • Axes of Assembly, Reorientation & Blind Assembly
  • Top Down, Uni-Axis Assembly
  • Self-Fixturing vs. Production Fixtures
  • Joining & Fastening Guidelines
    • Integral Attachment (Self-Fastening & Snap-Fit Assembly) Guidelines
    • Threaded Fastener Considerations & Guidelines
    • Adhesive Joining Guidelines
    • Welding Guidelines
    • Other Fastening Methods and Guidelines
  • Finishing, Adjustment & Calibration
  • DFA Considerations to Facilitate Test and Inspection
  • Applying DFA to Packaging - The Final Assembly Step
  • Case Studies and Benefits - Aerospace, Automotive, Electronics, Mechanical Machinery
  • Design for Assembly Analysis Exercise
2. DESIGN FOR AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY (optional module)
  • Production Considerations for Manual, Flexible Automation and Hard Automation
  • Cost / Benefit Analysis of Automation
  • Design for Feeding Guidelines
  • Feeding Systems & Orientation
  • Flexible Automation
    • Design for Robotic Assembly Guidelines
    • Design for Vision System Guidelines
    • Gripper Design Guidelines
3. DFM/A FOR ELECTRONICS (optional module)
  • Use of DFM/A Guidelines for Boards
  • Simplify the Assembly Process - Mixing Technology and Board Sides
  • Reduce Thermal Cycles
  • Board Size and Panelization Guidelines
  • PCB Layout Guidelines
    • Panel Considerations and Keep-Out Area
    • Tooling Hools
    • Fiducials
    • Through-Holes and Vias
    • Trace Width and Spacing
    • Pad Layout and Component Spacing
    • Test Point Access
  • Component Selection Guidelines
  • Avoid Manual Assembly
  • Other Component Considerations
  • DFM/A Assessment for Boards
  • Automated Design Rules Checking
4. DESIGN FOR MANUFACTURABILITY
  • DFM Framework
  • Material and Process Evaluation
  • Material and Process Evaluation Exercise
  • Raw Material Standardization
  • General DFM Guidelines
  • Machining Guidelines and Examples
  • Manufacturability Analysis Exercise
  • Sheet Metal and Stamping Guidelines and Examples
  • Injection Molding Guidelines and Examples
  • Casting Guidelines and Examples
  • Minimize Finishing Requirements
5. PROCESS CAPABILITY AND TOLERANCES
  • What is Process Capability
  • Variation and Specifications
  • Parameter and Tolerance Objectives
  • Statistical Process Capability
    • Normal Distribution
    • Capabilities Indices - Cp and Cpk
    • Capability Index Exercises
    • Six Sigma Capability and Defects per Million
  • Effect of Tolerances
  • Tolerance Analysis
    • Worst Case
    • Root Sum of Squares (RSS)
  • Tolerance Optimization
6. DFM/A AND THE DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
  • DFM/A Process Steps
    • During Concept Development Phase
    • During Design Phase
    • During Validation and Pilot Phase
    • During Production Launch Phase
  • Early Manufacturing Involvement
  • DFM/A Collaboration Tools and Methods
  • Role of Solids and Assembly Models in DFM/A Evaluation
  • How to Effectively Consider Design Alternatives to Address DFM/A Issues
  • Product Cost Models to Estimate Costs & Evaluate Design Alternatives
  • Early Supplier Involvement
  • Developing DFM/A Guidelines
  • Formal DFM/A Analysis & Assessment
  • DFM/A Manual and Software Tools
  • Conducting Design Reviews to Address DFM/A
  • Capturing Issues with Build Reports
  • Closing the Loop with a Final Production Review
  • DFM/A Performance Measurement & Metrics
7. SUMMARY
  • 10 Steps to DFM/A
  • DFM/A Survey Results
  • Sources of Further Information
  • Questions and Discussion
8. DFM/A ANALYSIS OF COMPANY PRODUCT OR ASSEMBLY
  • Transitioning from the Workshop to Product Design - Exercise Objectives
  • Introduction of Analysis Methodology and DFM/A Worksheet
  • Team Analysis of Company Products or Assemblies
  • Team Consideration of DFM/A Improvements
  • Team Reporting Out and Exercise Discussion
  • Concluding Questions and Discussion

Best Practices of New Product Development Workshop

This three- or five-day workshop is based on our framework of 270 best practices for product development that we have maintained over the last nineteen years. These best practices address the dimensions of organization, process, design optimization, and technology tools. The workshop can include exercises to reinforce the concepts presented. The five-day version of the workshop includes more detail related to the best practices and more exercises to reinforce understanding. 1. BEST PRACTICES OF NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

  • Introduction
  • Applying Best Practices: A Framework of 270 Best Practices for Product Development
2. IDEATION
  • Sources of Ideas for New Products
  • Capturing Ideas
  • Evaluating Ideas
  • Making the Decision to Investigate a New Product Idea
  • Supporting Tools and Systems
3. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT & PIPELINE MANAGEMENT
  • Portfolio Management Goals
  • Methods to Support Portfolio Management
  • The Business Plan and Strategic Allocation
  • Methods and Considerations for Prioritizing Projects
  • Steps to Achieve Balance in the Proposed Portfolio
  • Checking the Portfolio Plan - Resources and Financial Objectives
  • An Overall Approach to Portfolio Management
4. MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT WITH GATE REVIEWS
  • Gate Review Objectives
  • Gate Review Preparation
    • Business Case
    • Risk vs. Reward
  • Gate Reviews – A Two-Part Decision
  • Gate Review Criteria and Scoring
  • Gate Review Process and Ground Rules
  • Hard vs. Soft Gates
  • Lean Gate Review Process and Best Practices
5. ORGANIZING FOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
  • Effectively Empowering Teams - Two Sides to the Equation
  • Cross-Functional Teams - the Key to Effective Early Involvement
  • Best Practices for Product Development Teams (PDT's) or Integrated Product Teams (IPT's)
    • Launching Effective Teams
    • Structuring and Integrating Teams on Large Programs
    • "Internal" & "External" Factors Affecting Team Success
    • Practical Approaches to Collocation
    • Team Leader Responsibilities
    • Effective Team Collaboration and Decision-Making
  • Integrating Suppliers - Early Supplier Involvement
6. PLANNING AND MANAGING THE PROJECT
  • Best Practices for Project Management
  • Developing the Project Plan - Rolling Planning and Team Member Involvement
  • Identifying and Managing Project Risks
  • Critical Chain Project Management - A Key to Reduce Project Schedule
  • The Iron Triangle - Know What Project Parameters Are Important
7. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
  • Establishing a Repeatable vs. Ad-Hoc Development Process
  • Tailor the Process to Different Project Types
  • Key Activities by Project Phase
  • Performance Measurement & Metrics
8. CUSTOMER-FOCUSED DEVELOPMENT
  • Define the Market - A Starting Point
  • Understanding the Voice of the Customer (VOC) - Best Practices
  • Voice of the Customer Methods and Best Practices
  • Organizing and Interpreting VOC Data
  • Quality Function Deployment (QFD) - Translating Customer Needs into Product Plans & Requirements
  • QFD Process & Examples
  • Effectively Using QFD
9. LEAN DESIGN - OPTIMIZING CUSTOMER VALUE
  • Target Costing and Design to Cost - a Framework for Customer Value
  • Establishing a Market-Driven Target Price
  • Deriving a Target Cost and Tracking Target Cost Achievement
  • Using Product Cost Models to Guide Development Decisions
  • Design to Cost Actions During Each Phase of Development
  • Value Analysis/Function Analysis
  • A Design for Manufacturability/ Assembly (DFM/A) - a Key Component of Lean Design
    • Design for Assembly Guidelines with Examples
    • Design for Manufacturability Guidelines for Fabricating Parts
    • Determining Process Capabilities & Developing Guidelines
    • DFM/A Analysis Tools
  • Robust Design - Design of Experiments (DOE) and Taguchi Quality Engineering
  • Addressing Reliability, Maintainability, Testability and Other Factors
  • Enhancing Reliability with Design Failure Modes and Effects Analaysis (DFMEA)
  • Reducing Mistakes and Controlling the Process with Process FMEA (PFMEA)
  • Establishing a Development Process Oriented to Lean Design
10. ENABLING TECHNOLOGY
  • Using a Common Digital Product Model
  • Integrated CAD/CAE/CAM Tools
    • Solid Modeling, Assembly Modeling & Assembly Modeling
    • Analysis-Driven Design
    • Integrated Electronic Design Automation
  • Rapid Prototyping
  • Managing Product Data with Product Lifecycle Management (PLM)
  • Knowledge Organization & Design Re-Use
11. PRODUCT VALIDATION AND LAUNCH
  • Establishing a Validation and Verification Plan
  • Prototype to Get Rapid Feedback
  • Validating the Product and Process
  • Product Launch Best Practices
12. LEAN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES
  • Lean Principles and Supporting Practices
  • Eliminate Waste from the Product Development Value Stream
  • Make the Value Creating Steps Flow
    • Pipeline Management to Manage Queues
    • Flow Process and "Pull" Scheduling
    • Small Batch Sizes in Product Development
    • Defer Commitment to Address Change
    • Rapidly Explore Alternatives
  • Amplify Learning
13. MANAGING THE PRODUCT LIFECYCLE
  • Support Products During Their Life
  • Monitor and Extend Product Life
  • Determining When a Product Should Be Phased-Out
14. IMPLEMENTATION - MAKING IT HAPPEN
  • Assessing Your Product Development Process Against the Best Practices
  • Developing an Overall Improvement Plan
  • Metrics for Measuring Performance
  • Discussion - Participant Questions and Issues